Mon December 03, 2007

Incentive and SIM lock (6) - more confusing?

In response to the criticism against their business model based on the incentive to the cellphone dealers, Japan's major mobile operators have implemented a new tariff.

It charges the users for the handset without any discount when they get new one over the counter and costs them less monthly fee than ever before.

However, it depends on the terms and conditions including the mobile operator's policy and how long you will use the handset whether you can really save on the cellphone bill or not.

Their tariffs seem to have got more complicated and users should be more careful to choose them.

posted by sam at 14:05:08 JST on Mon December 03, 2007 | Comment(0) | TrackBack(0) | mobile

Wed November 07, 2007

Android

Google is poised to launch a platform - Android - for cellphone.
They are allied with more than thirty organizations including NTT DoCoMo and KDDI from Japan.

posted by sam at 12:29:21 JST on Wed November 07, 2007 | Comment(0) | TrackBack(0) | mobile

Wed September 19, 2007

Incentive and SIM lock (5) - pro and con

Pro

  • You can get a cellphone handset at a less expensive price than that worth of it over the counter at a cellphone dealer.

Con

  • You would pay more than the real price of the handset by paying the cellphone operator the monthly fee if you use the same handset for over two years or so.

posted by sam at 09:26:10 JST on Wed September 19, 2007 | Comment(0) | TrackBack(0) | mobile

Fri September 07, 2007

Incentive and SIM lock (4) - How do they work? (3)

It will take about two years for Japan's mobile operators to retrieve all the cost of the incentive they give to their dealers per handset.

The retrieval is done by adding a fraction of the cost to the monthly fee the users pay.

If the user - just after buying a “SIM lock-free” cellphone handset activated by a mobile operator - replaces the SIM card with that provided by another mobile operator and moves to it for new subscription, the mobile operator the user have moved away from would not be able to complete the retrieval.

SIM lock-free handsets therefore are unavailable from the cellphone dealers affiliated with Japan’s mobile operators.

posted by sam at 03:49:22 JST on Fri September 07, 2007 | Comment(0) | TrackBack(0) | mobile

Sun August 19, 2007

Incentive and SIM lock (3) - How do they work? (2)

Japan's mobile operators give much incentive to their dealers to boost the handset sales.

How can the mobile operators retrieve the cost of the incentive?

The mobile operators in fact add a fraction of the cost to the monthly fee the users pay.

In this way Japan's mobile operators retrieve all the cost of the incentive per handset for about two years.

This is also where “SIM lock” plays a significant part.

posted by sam at 10:46:35 JST on Sun August 19, 2007 | Comment(0) | TrackBack(0) | mobile

Mon August 06, 2007

Incentive and SIM lock (2) - How do they work? (1)

In Japan, when cellphone dealers sell a handset worth it, for example ¥30,000 or more, they get some incentive from the mobile operator.

The dealers can offset by the incentive the loss due to selling the handset even for ¥1.

How can the mobile operator then retrieve the cost of the incentive?

posted by sam at 03:14:18 JST on Mon August 06, 2007 | Comment(0) | TrackBack(0) | mobile

Mon July 30, 2007

BlackBerry (2) - Dominates Japan's mobile market?

Will the BlackBerry services launched for corporate users by NTT DoCoMo lead to wider adoption of BlackBerry in Japan?

Japanese users - most, if not all of them - have got used to single-handed manipulations of a cellphone handset, so BlackBerry won't appeal to Japan's market as significantly as it has done to the international market, according to some of the industry analyses.

The analyses don't indicate that Japanese people's fingers are all thumbs.

posted by sam at 00:29:34 JST on Mon July 30, 2007 | Comment(0) | TrackBack(0) | mobile
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